Better views of our Black-and-chestnut Eagle nest

The Black-and-chestnut Eagle on its nest. Photo: Recalde brothers/EcoMinga.

The Black-and-chestnut Eagle on its nest. Photo: Recalde brothers/EcoMinga.

In a recent post I was excited about our guards’ discovery of a nest of the endangered Black-and-chestnut Eagle (Spizaetus isidori) in our Rio Zunac Reserve. At that time they only had photos taken from a long distance away, but they were as excited as I was, and spent the last few days searching for better viewing angles. They’ve succeeded.

The above photo is the view from a spot close to the nest, but with bright sky behind it. On a clear day this might be useful for photography.

They also succeeded in finding a clear view from a point above the nest, so they can now see what is going on inside. The photos are still a bit rough, since they are some distance from the nest, and the camera lenses have been fogging up due to the high humidity and heavy rain. But we’ll get better at this as time goes on. I expect we’ll be able to make some amazing videos of the prey items they will bring in as the baby eagle grows.

Black-and-chestnut Eagles at their nest. One parent is incubating and the other is arriving, perhaps to take its turn. Photo: Recalde brothers/EcoMinga.

Black-and-chestnut Eagles at their nest. One parent is incubating and the other is arriving, perhaps to take its turn. Photo: Recalde brothers/EcoMinga.

We’re all waiting eagerly to see what they will feed the baby….

Lou Jost

10 thoughts on “Better views of our Black-and-chestnut Eagle nest

  1. I am quite convinced, that you try not to disturb the breedings birds. But just to be completely sure: Did the birds realize, that they are being watched by people?

    • Yes, the birds initially did notice that they were being watched by the guards, when they decided to set up a camera trap at an observation point to observe the nest. We have now instructed the guards to stay away for a while and keep their distance. We will draw on the experience of raptor experts to make sure the guards don’t disturb the birds.

      • That’s fantastic! :-). I keep an eye on your great work,since I learned about Fundacion Ecominga at the World Land Trust’s webpage – truly fantastic. Hopefully, you can protect more land in the region!

  2. Pingback: Black-and-chestnut Eagles (Spizaetus ornatus) again, in a different reserve | Fundacion EcoMinga

  3. Pingback: Our baby Black-and-chestnut Eagle is growing up fast! | Fundacion EcoMinga

  4. Pingback: An eagle specialist team visits our Black-and-chestnut Eagle (Spizaetus isidori) nest | Fundacion EcoMinga

  5. Pingback: This year’s Black-and-chestnut Eagle nest is doing well | Fundacion EcoMinga

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