Traveling in the trees with Woolly Monkeys


As I explained in our last post, our reserve guards Luis and Santiago Recalde decided to climb into the trees to join a passing troop of Woolly Monkeys in our Rio Zunac cloud forest. This sounds impossible, but the monkeys, which used to be scared of people ten years ago, now feel so secure that they went about their business as if Luis and Santiago weren’t there. As a result, our reserve guards were able to make intimate videos of the daily lives of these Woolly Monkeys from a remarkable perspective.

In the above video, I’ve edited their clips down to a few more or less stable ones. For those who really want to see more, there are two longer versions on EcoMinga’s YouTube channel. These include shakier cuts and cuts with less-good lighting:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoSSjHTpkWqBwvW0pjBRY9g

These animals are part of a local cloud forest population of Woolly Monkeys, ranging up to 2400m and above. Most Woolly Monkey populations live in the lowlands of Amazonia. They are among the first animals to disappear when humans occupy a forest, because they have lots of tasty meat. Many are killed every year to feed guests during local indigenous fiestas. Our population of Woolly Monkeys is one of the very few completely safe ones. It was nice to see in these videos that virtually all the adult females in this troop of 18 were carrying babies.

Here are some screen captures from the raw videos of Luis and Santiago. Click on them to enlarge:
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Past Woolly Monkey posts:
EcoMinga’s primates 1: Woolly Monkeys
Quick visit to our Rio Zunac field station
Rio Zunac update: Predator and prey
Woolly Monkeys again
Our guards Luis and Santiago Recalde climb into the trees with a troop of Woolly Monkeys

Lou Jost

One thought on “Traveling in the trees with Woolly Monkeys

  1. Pingback: Traveling in the trees with Woolly Monkeys, Part 2 | Fundacion EcoMinga

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