World Land Trust Big Match campaign for EcoMinga: “Forests in the Sky”, October 1 to 15

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=01i_s-i093U
Drone video of our Cerro Candelaria Reserve and the proposed “Forests in the Sky” corridor, by Backpacker Films. Thanks very much to Jeremy and Greg for making this for us!

Every year, during the first two weeks of October, the World Land Trust (the UK charity which is our largest source of funds) has a major fundraising campaign, the “Big Match” campaign, for one of their partner’s urgent projects. This year, they have chosen us as the beneficiary, for our project to protect a critical strip of forest, the “Forests in the Sky”, connecting Ecuador’s northeast Andes to its southeast Andes. During these 15 days, donations to the WLT for this project will be matched 1:1, so any donation is effectively doubled.

If the campaign is successful, we will be able to protect the remaining forest corridor between two national parks, Los Llanganates and Sangay, so that animals like the rare Mountain Tapir (Tapirus pinchaque), Spectacled Bear, puma, Black-and-chestnut Eagle, and others will continue to be able to pass between the northern and southern ranges of the eastern Andes in Ecuador. This interchange is important in order to avoid inbreeding and maintain genetic diversity in animals whose population sizes are low. Genetic diversity is especially important in a fast-changing world such as our current one— climate change and introduced diseases will pose novel challenges to these animals, and genetic diversity will provide the raw material permitting each species to meet these challenges.

An elevation map of the Andes of Ecuador, with blue being lowest, red and white being highest. The straight, deep valley of the Rio Pastaza (in white rectangle) breaks the eastern Andes into a northern and southern part.

An elevation map of the Andes of Ecuador, with blue being lowest, red and white being highest. The straight, deep valley of the Rio Pastaza (in white rectangle) breaks the eastern Andes into a northern and southern part.

The elevation map of Ecuador above clearly shows the strategic importance of the gap we are trying to protect. Blue represents low elevations, while red and white represent high elevations. The map shows that the Ecuadorian Andes are divided into a western range and an eastern range, with a dry central plateau (almost completely deforested) separating them. The eastern range has only one deep blue cut, in about the center of the country. That low valley, which is now partly deforested, is the valley of the Rio Pastaza, where we work. This is the place in the eastern Andes where deforestation will break the connectivity of the eastern Andes. This is the place that has to be saved if connectivity is to be preserved.

Google Earth image showing the Rio Pastaza valley (white rectangle).

Click to enlarge. Google Earth image showing the Rio Pastaza valley (white rectangle).

Lateral view of the Rio Pastaza valley.

Click to enlarge. Lateral view of the Rio Pastaza valley.

The importance of this corridor was first realized in the late 1990s by the Fundacion Natura and the World Wildlife Fund, who sponsored a series of scientific studies of the area. As a result, the town of Banos, along with several neighboring towns, passed resolutions declaring this the “Corredor Ecologico Llanganates-Sangay”, and recognized the special status of the area in their official land use plans. The governments pledged to encourage sustainable development and ecotourism in the area. In 2002 the World Wildlife Fund declared this corridor a “Gift to the Earth”, the only Ecuadorian landscape which has received this designation apart from the Galapagos Islands (which received it in 1997).

With the help of Fundacion Natura staff (especially Xavier Viteri and Dania Quirola), management plans were drawn up, and workshops were held for the local people living in the corridor. There was broad local support for the initiative, and many very nice plans. However, in the end the local governments did not establish any reserves to protect this forest. There was a willingness to do so among some departments, but no funds available. The local governments also did not pass any real measures to restrict land use in the corridor, and Fundacion Natura itself went bankrupt and disappeared.

Our Fundacion EcoMinga was formed in 2006. Shortly after its formation, the environmental officer of the town of Banos told me that a large tract of land between the two national parks had been offered to the town for purchase, but that there were no funds to buy it. He asked if we might be able to buy it, so that it would not be lost for conservation. We therefore made a proposal to the World Land Trust, and they quickly found a donor, Puro Coffee, to sponsor the purchase. This was the beginning of our Cerro Candelaria Reserve, whose southern border is Sangay National Park. Over the years we have extended this protected forest northward towards the other national park, Los Llanganates, with the help of WLT corporate donors PricewaterhouseCoopers and Naturetrek. We have now protected an almost-continuous strip of forest from Sangay National Park to the Rio Pastaza, and we work closely with WWF-Ecuador in helping to create a new management plan for the whole corridor.

WWF draft map of the officially declared corridor between the two national parks, with our reserves shown hatched in red. The large Cerro Candelaria and Naturetrek Reserves on the west edge of that area form the backbone of our "Forests in the Sky" corridor reserve. The areas of the corridor outside our reserves receive no protection.  Map courtesy WWF and Pedro Plinio Araujo.

WWF draft map of the officially declared corridor between the two national parks, with our reserves shown hatched in red. The large Cerro Candelaria and Naturetrek Reserves on the west edge of that area form the backbone of our “Forests in the Sky” corridor reserve. The areas of the corridor outside our reserves receive no protection. Map courtesy WWF and Pedro Plinio Araujo.

Researchers Karima Lopez, Gorki Rios, Carolina Reyes, and our own Juan Pablo Reyes and the Recalde brothers, have placed many camera traps in this protected strip. The cameras reveal healthy populations of all the large mammals that might use a corridor. For example, Gorki Rios was able to identify (on the basis of variations in the bears’ “spectacles”) at least eight individual Spectacled Bears using this forest. Puma, mountain tapir, brocket deer, and smaller mammals were also recorded.

Eight different individual Spectacled Bears who all use our Cerro Candelaria Reserve. Credit:  PCTA, Gorki Rios, compiled by Juan Pablo Reyes.

Eight different individual Spectacled Bears who all use our Cerro Candelaria Reserve. Credit: PCTA, Gorki Rios, compiled by Juan Pablo Reyes.

Mountain Tapir in the corridor. Photo: PCTA/Juan Pablo Reyes/EcoMinga.

Mountain Tapir in the corridor. Photo: PCTA/Juan Pablo Reyes/EcoMinga.

Puma (Felis concolor) in the corridor. Photo: PCTA/Juan Pablo Reyes/EcoMinga

Puma (Felis concolor) in the corridor. Photo: PCTA/Juan Pablo Reyes/EcoMinga

Marc and Denise Dragiewicz, Eyes of the World Films, filmed the upper parts of the Cerro Candelaria reserve recently (thanks Marc and Denise!):
https://vimeo.com/120318577

Their time-lapse video of Cerro Candelaria’s clouds:
https://vimeo.com/120940582

This month’s Big Match campaign will, if successful, allow us to continue extending our protected corridor across the the Rio Pastaza and northward to finally connect with the Los Llanganates national park. We will finally be able to make the local community’s proposal into reality.

Cerro Mayordomo, rising from the Rio Pastaza valley. Los Llanganates National Park begins near its peak. Its southern slope is the target of he "Forests in the Sky" campaign to join Los Llanganates and Sangay National Parks. Googel Earth/Lou Jost.

Cerro Mayordomo, rising from the Rio Pastaza valley. Los Llanganates National Park begins near its peak. Its southern slope is the target of the “Forests in the Sky” campaign to join Los Llanganates and Sangay National Parks. Googel Earth/Lou Jost.

The land we are trying to buy, on Cerro Mayordomo, is itself some of the most interesting and unique forest in Ecuador, as WWF also recognized in their “Gift to the Earth” declaration. Cerro Mayordomo is where I first discovered the spectacular evolutionary radiation of the orchid genus Teagueia. It is also the place where I discovered several new species of Lepanthes orchids, such as L. marshana, L. aprina, and L. mayordomensis. A spectacular recently-described tree, Meriania aurata, is also found on Cerro Mayordomo, though it was first discovered near our Rio Zunac Reserve. There are likely to be many more discoveries of new species as we explore it more.

Lepanthes mayordomensis, a new species so far found only on the land we hope to purchase for the corridor. Photo: Lou Jost/EcoMinga.

Lepanthes mayordomensis, a new species so far found only on the land we hope to purchase for the corridor. Photo: Lou Jost/EcoMinga.

Click to enlarge. The twisted forest near the top of Cerro Candelaria. The forest near the top of Cerro Mayordomo is similar. Photo: Lou Jost/EcoMinga.

Click to enlarge. The twisted forest near the top of Cerro Candelaria. Note man in the middle. The forest near the top of Cerro Mayordomo is similar. Photo: Lou Jost/EcoMinga.

Cerro Mayordomo is also where I first found a nest of the endangered Black-and-chestnut Eagle (Spizaetus isidori), about eighteen or nineteen years ago. I’ve written more about that eagle here. Below, the eagle flies over the Corridor. You can see the Banos-Puyo highway breaking its continuity. However, this road disappears into a very long tunnel just off the right-hand side of the picture. The forest we will buy for the corridor has the highway running deep underneath it!

Black and chestnut Eagle (Spizaetus isidori) crossing the corridor. Below is the Rio Pastaza and the Banos-Puyo highway, which disappears into a tunnel just to the right. Photo: Luis Recalde/EcoMinga.

Black and chestnut Eagle (Spizaetus isidori) crossing the corridor. Below is the Rio Pastaza and the Banos-Puyo highway, which disappears into a tunnel just to the right. Photo: Luis Recalde/EcoMinga.

A Black-and-Chestnut Eagle flies past its nest in a cloud forest in eastern Ecuador. Photo credit: © Mark C. Wilson

A Black-and-Chestnut Eagle flies over a cloud forest in eastern Ecuador. Photo credit: © Mark C. Wilson

Black-and-chestnut Eagle juvenile in our Cerro Candelaria Reserve. Photo:  Luis Recalde/EcoMinga.

Black-and-chestnut Eagle juvenile in our Cerro Candelaria Reserve. Photo: Luis Recalde/EcoMinga.

There is considerable urgency to make these purchases now. In December of this year, the President of Ecuador will resubmit to Congress a law establishing very high capital gains taxes for large land sales. If this law is passed, prices for large lots will double or triple, making the Corridor economically very difficult to complete.

Please help us make this corridor a reality. Donate to the World Land Trust’s 2015 Big Match Campaign for the “Forests in the Sky” corridor; your donation will be duplicated by them!

Lou Jost

Video de dron de nuestra Reserva Cerro Candelaria y el corredor propuesto “Bosques en el cielo”, por Backpacker Films. ¡Muchas gracias a Jeremy y Greg por hacer esto para nosotros!
 
Cada año durante las primeras dos semanas de Octubre, el World Land Trust (la caridad de UK la cual es nuestra mayor fuente de recursos) tiene una campaña de levantamiento de fondos “Big Match”, para uno de sus proyectos urgentes. Este año, nos han elegido como beneficiarios, para nuestro proyecto para proteger una franja crítica de bosque, el “Forests in the Sky” o “Bosques en el Cielo”, conectando los Andes del noreste de Ecuador al sureste. Durante estos 15 días, las donaciones a la WLT para este proyecto serán emparejados 1:1, así que cualquier donación será efectivamente doblada. 
 
Si la campaña es exitosa, seremos capaces de proteger el corredor remanente de bosque entre dos parques nacionales, Los Llanaganates y Sangay, de modo que los animales como el raro Tapir de Montaña (Tapirus pinchaque), Oso de anteojos, puma, Águila andina, y otros continuarán siendo capaces de pasar entre las cordilleras norte y sur de los Andes del este en Ecuador. Este intercambio también es importante para evitar la endogamia y mantener la diversidad genética en animales cuyo tamaño de la población son bajos. La diversidad genética es especialmente importante en un mundo que cambia rápidamente como el nuestro – cambio climático y enfermedades introducidas plantearán nuevos desafíos a estos animales, y la diversidad genética proveerá la materia prima que permitirá a cada especie hacer frente a estos desafíos. 
 
IMG – Un mapa de altitud de los Andes del Ecuador, con azul siendo lo más bajo, rojo y blanco siendo lo más alto. El valle recto y profundo del río Pastaza (en el rectángulo blanco) quiebra los Andes orientales en una parte norte y sur. 
 
El mapa de elevación de Ecuador arriba, muestra claramente la importancia estratégica del gap que estamos tratando de proteger. El azul representa las elevaciones bajas, mientras el rojo y blanco representan las altas elevaciones. El mapa muestra que los Andes ecuatorianos están divididos en una cordillera occidental y una cordillera oriental, con una meseta central (casi completamente deforestada) separándolos. La cordillera oriental tiene solo un corte azul profundo, en casi el centro del país. El valle bajo, que es ahora parcialmente deforestado, es el valle del Río Pastaza, donde trabajamos. Este es el lugar en los Andes orientales donde la deforestación romperá la conectividad de los Andes orientales. Este es el lugar que tiene que ser salvado si la conectividad será preservada. 
 
IMG – Click para agrandar. La imagen de Google Earth mostrando el valle del río Pastaza (rectángulo blanco)
 
IMG – Click para agrandar. Vista lateral del valle del Río Pastaza.
 
La importancia de este corredor fue primero comprendido en los tardíos 1990s por la Fundación Natura y el World Wildlife Fund, quienes patrocinaron una serie de estudios científicos del área. Como resultado, el pueblo de Baños, junto con varios pueblos vecinos, aceptaron resoluciones declarando este el “Corredor Ecológico Llanganates- Sangay”, y reconociendo el estado especial del área en sus planes de uso de suelo oficiales. El gobierno prometió fomentar el desarrollo sostenible y ecoturismo en el área. En 2002 el World Wildlife Fund declaró este corredor como “Regalo de la Tierra” *Link no válido*, el único paisaje ecuatoriano que ha recibido esta designación aparte de las Islas Galápagos (la cual la recibió en 1997). 
 
Con ayuda del equipo de Fundación Natura (especialmente Xavier Viteri y Dania Quirola) se elaboraron planes de manejo y se realizaron talleres para la población local que vive en el corredor. Hubo un amplio apoyo local para la iniciativa y muchos planes muy buenos. Sin embargo, al final el gobierno local no estableció ninguna reserva para proteger este bosque. Algunos departamentos estaban dispuestos a hacerlo, pero no hubo fondos disponibles. Los gobiernos locales tampoco pasaron ninguna medida para restringir el uso de tierra en el corredor, y la Fundación Natura por sí misma quebró y desapareció. 
 
Nuestra Fundación EcoMinga fue formada en 2006. Poco después de su formación, el ambiente de oficina del pueblo de Baños me dijo que un largo trecho de tierra entre los dos parques nacionales han sido ofrecidos al pueblo para su adquisición, pero que no había fondos para comprarlo. Él me preguntó si podríamos ser capaces de comprarlo para que no se pierda para su conservación. Por lo tanto, hicimos una propuesta al World Land Trust y rápidamente encontraron un donante, Puro Coffe, para patrocinar la compra. Este fue el comienzo de nuestra Reserva Cerro Candelaria, cuya frontera sur es el Parque Nacional Sangay. A lo largo de los años hemos extendido este bosque protegido hacia el norte, hacia el otro parque nacional, los Llanganates, con ayuda de los donantes WLT PricewaterhouseCoopers y Naturetrek. A lo largo de los años hemos extendido este bosque protegido hacia el norte hacia el otro parque nacional, Los Llanganates, con la ayuda de los donantes corporativos de WLT PricewaterhouseCoopers y Naturetrek. Ahora hemos protegido una franja casi continua de bosque del Parque Nacional Sangay al Río Pastaza, y trabajamos de cerca con la WWF Ecuador en ayudar a crear un nuevo plan de manejo para el corredor completo. 
 
IMG – Mapa preliminar de la WWF del corredor declarado oficialmente entre los dos parques nacionales, con nuestras reservas sombreadas en rojo. Las grandes Reservas Cerro Candelaria y Naturetrek en el borde oeste de esa área forman la columna vertebral de nuestra reserva del corredor “Bosques en el cielo”. Las áreas del corredor fuera de nuestras reservas no reciben protección. Mapa cortesía de WWF y Pedro Plinio Araujo. 
 
Los investigadores Karima Lopez, Gorki Rios, Carolina Reyes y nuestro propio Juan Pablo Reyes y los hermanos Recalde, han ubicado muchas trampas cámara en esta franja protegida. Las cámaras revelan poblaciones saludables de todos los grandes mamíferos que podrían usar un corredor. Por ejemplo. Gorki Ríos fue capaz de identificar (en base a la variación en los osos de anteojos) al menos a ocho individuos  de osos de anteojos usando este bosque. Puma, tapir de montaña, mazama, y mamíferos más pequeños son también registrados.
 
IMG – Ocho individuos diferentes de osos de anteojos quienes usan nuestra Reserva Cerro Candelaria. Crédito: PCTA, Gorki Ríos, compilado por Juan Pablo Reyes.
 
IMG – Tapir de montaña en el corredor. Fotografía: PCTA/Juan Pablo Reyes/EcoMinga
 
IMG – Puma (Felis concolor) en el corredor. Fotografía: PCTA/Juan Pablo Reyes/EcoMinga
 
Marc y Denise Dragiewicz, Eyes of the World Films (https://vimeo.com/eyesoftheworldfilms), filmando las partes superiores de la Reserva Cerro Candelaria recientemente (gracias a Marc y Denise!):
 
Su video de lapso de tiempo de las nubes de Cerro Candelaria. 
 
Este mes, la campaña Big Match será, si exitosa, nos permitirá continuar extendiendo nuestro corredor protegido a lo largo del Río Pastaza y hacia el norte para finalmente conectar con el Parque Nacional Los Llanganates. Finalmente seremos capaces de hacer realidad la propuesta de la comunidad local. 
 
IMG – Cerro Mayordomo, creciendo a lo largo del valle del Río Pastaza. El Parque Nacional Los Llanganates comienza cerca de su pico. Su vertiente sur es el objetivo de la campaña “Bosques en el cielo” para unirse a los Parques Nacionales Los Llanganates y Sangay. 
 
La tierra que estamos tratando de comprar, en Cerro Mayordomo, es en sí misma una de los bosques más interesantes y únicos del Ecuador, como también reconoció WWF en su declaración “Regalo de la Tierra”. Cerro Mayordomo es donde descubrí por primera vez la radiación evolutiva espectacular del género de orquídeas Teagueia. También es el lugar donde descubrí varias nuevas especies de orquídeas Lepanthes, como L. marshana, L. aprina, y L. mayordomensis. Un árbol recién descubierto, Meriania aurata, también fue encontrado en Cerro Mayordomo, aunque fue primero descubierto cerca de nuestra Reserva Río Zuñac. Es probable que haya muchos más descubrimientos de nuevas especies a medida que las exploremos más. 
 
IMG – Lepanthes mayordomensis, una nueva especie encontrada hasta ahora solo en la tierra que esperamos comprar para el corredor. Fotografía: Lou Jost / EcoMinga. 
 
IMG – Click para agrandar. El bosque retorcido cerca de la cima del Cerro Candelaria. Note al hombre en el medio. El bosque cerca de la cima del Cerro Mayordomo es similar. Fotografía: Lou Jost / EcoMinga. 
 
Cerro Mayordomo también es donde encontré por primera vez un nido de águila negra y castaña (Spizaetus isidori), en peligro de extinción, hace unos dieciocho o diecinueve años. He escrito más acerca de esa águila aquí. Abajo, el águila sobrevuela el corredor. Se puede ver la carretera Baños – Puyo rompiendo su continuidad. Sin embargo, esta carretera desaparece en un túnel muy largo justo al lado derecho de la imagen. ¡El bosque que compraremos para el corredor tiene la carretera muy por debajo!
 
IMG – Águila andina (Spizaetus isidori) cruzando el corredor. Debajo está el río Pastaza y la carretera Baños Puyo, la cual desaparece en un túnel justo a la derecha. Fotografía: Luis Recalde / EcoMinga
 
IMG – Un águila andina vuela sobre un bosque nublado en el occidente de Ecuador. Crédito de la fotografía: Mark Wilson
 
IMG – Juvenil de águila andina en nuestra Reserva Cerro Candelaria. Fotografía: Luis Recalde/EcoMinga
 
Hay una urgencia considerable para hacer estas nuevas adquisiciones. En diciembre de este año, el Presidente del Ecuador reenviará al Congreso una ley estableciendo impuestos muy altos sobre las ganancias de capital para las grandes ventas de tierras. Si se aprueba esta ley, los precios de los lotes grandes se duplicarán o triplicarán, haciendo que el corredor sea económicamente muy difícil de completar. 
 
Por favor, ayúdanos a hacer realidad este corredor. Dona a la campaña World Land Trust 2015 para los corredores “Bosques en el cielo”; tu donación será duplicada por ellos!
 
Lou Jost, Fundación EcoMinga
Traducción: Salomé Solórzano-Flores

9 thoughts on “World Land Trust Big Match campaign for EcoMinga: “Forests in the Sky”, October 1 to 15

  1. Lou, we’ve tried to put in a donation and have had some trouble getting it to go through, so we’ll keep trying!

      • Lou, we finally got the thing right, so some money is winging its way to you from us. What you are doing is spectacular, so keep up the good work. We would like to come visit and see the area for ourselves. I’m a herpetologist so maybe I can find something unusual.

      • Thanks for persisting, Jim and Karin, and thanks for the kind words. ! I’d love to have you visit — I’ll send more info via email. As you know from this blog, we have many unusual and new herps, mostly frogs, thanks to the cool wet climate. Hope to meet you here some day,
        Lou

  2. Hey Lou, I cannot get the phone number working to donate for matching program as there isn’t time to snail mail a check. Help!

  3. Pingback: The Mountain Tapir (Tapirus pinchaque): Main customer for our proposed “Forest in the Sky” corridor | Fundacion EcoMinga

  4. Pingback: Exploring the “Forests in the Sky”: our new Rio Machay Reserve, east ridge | Fundacion EcoMinga

  5. Pingback: Our beautiful new frog species, Hyloscirtus sethmacfarlanei, is officially published today | Fundacion EcoMinga

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s