EcoMinga asociate and friend Andreas Kay has brain tumor removed, needs help

10507067_890718024350310_1921961958664110466_o

Photo: Andreas Kay

Andreas Kay, well-known macro photographer, friend, and close collaborator of EcoMinga, has just had a golf-ball-sized tumor removed from  his brain here in Quito. He is in great pain and under heavy medication. He posted the following message on his Facebook page, and I would like to share it here:

“Dear friends of Ecuador, I had an unexpected brain tumor and surgery by Dr. Danilo Pasternak in Quito and await the biopsy at the hospital now for further treatment.
I hope to be able to share more photos and videos from Ecuador soon. Especially I have plans to improve my footage in field macro videophotography.
If you want to support my recovery a donation would be highly welcome: http://www.paypal.me/EcuadorMegadiverso
I also have a TransferWise account by private message.
Thank you so much for your help.”

No photo description available.

Andreas’ brain tumor

12308783_516001961907492_2509443196681488007_n

Andreas has discovered many new species of plants, and several are named after him, including the orchids Lepanthopsis kayii and Lepanthes kayii. He also re-discovered and photographed the toad Atelopus coynei, once thought to be extinct:

https://whyevolutionistrue.wordpress.com/2012/02/16/my-frog-is-alive/

and he helped us set up our Dracula Reserve. He is best known for his magnificent collection of 29,048 macro insect and  plant photos from Andean Ecuador, published on his “Ecuador Megadiverso” Flickr site:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/andreaskay/sets

This vast collection of breathtaking photos surely contains many more species new to science.

Modified by CombineZP

Lepanthes kayii. Photo: Andreas Kay

Andreas has lived a simple life devoted to nature photography.  His brain tumor was not discovered until it was very large, and he is currently under heavy medication. We await the biopsy report in the next few days. Meanwhile we are trying to arrange additional medical care for him. Any help would be appreciated and should be sent directly to him. (Be aware that he may be under too much medication to respond promptly.)

Lou Jost, Fundacion EcoMinga

 

 

 

 

Rainforest Trust’s Species Legacy auction program includes new Dracula Reserve frog, forest mouse, and orchid

dav

New Pristimantis frog. Photo: EcoMinga/Jordy Salazar.

 

[Traducion en espanol abajo]

Tomorrow, December 8, 2018, the Rainforest Trust will put up for auction the naming rights for a number of new species from around the world. The goal is to raise money for Rainforest Trust’s partners, such as EcoMinga, to permanently protect each of these species, and then name each new species after the donor who protects them, or after a person or thing that the donor designates.

Rainforest Trust describes the program as “A historic opportunity to name a species new to science and protect their habitat… Rainforest Trust is celebrating 30 years of conservation success with the largest ever public auction of species naming rights. The twelve newly discovered species pictured below need scientific recognition and we’re providing an exclusive opportunity to preserve your legacy through purchasing the naming rights. Or bid to give the ultimate gift to a loved one this holiday season! Proceeds from this auction go directly to the nature reserves in which these species live, so a bid for one of these species’ names is a chance to both save them from extinction and honor someone or something you care about.”

Rainforest Trust has included three species from the Dracula Reserve and its vicinity, including the most beautiful frog of the whole auction, and the only mammal, and the biggest orchid:

 

MarioYanez49

New Pristimantis frog. Photo: Mario Yanez

Pristimantis sp. nov.  (blue eyes)

This stunning new frog with unusual blue to blue-gray eyes was featured in an earlier post. It was found after a long journey into one of the best foothill forests our herpetologist reserve manager, Juan Pablo Reyes, had ever seen in western Ecuador. This forest is adjacent to our current Dracula Reserve, and a target for future purchase, so Juan Pablo and Mario Yanez (INABIO) were charged with investigating it. On their first night in this magnificent forest, these experienced frog scientists quickly became aware of a series of strange unfamiliar frog songs, most of them coming from the canopy above their heads. (Like the best birdwatchers, good frog scientists know the calls of all the local frogs, and hunt for new species mostly by sound.) Searching for the sources of these calls with their flashlights, Juan Pablo and Mario finally located the eye reflections of one of the mystery frogs singing on an aroid leaf about 3.5 meters above  the ground. Juan Pablo climbed a neighboring trunk and was able to use a stick to knock off the leaf, which spun to the ground while the frog stuck firmly to its surface! The herpetologists caught it, and the moment they saw its blue eyes contrasting with the yellow body mottled with brown, they knew they had found a species new to science.

 

_DSC4378

New forest mouse. Photo: Jorge Brito

Chilomys sp. nov.

This little animal was first encountered during our initial Dracula Reserve expedition in 2015, with scientists from the Instituto Nacional de Biodiversidad (INABIO) and University of Basel (Switzerland) in search of mammals, reptiles, and amphibians. Jorge Brito from INABIO was the mammal expert. During the first week of the expedition very few animals were found, but among them were three small individuals in the small genus Chilomys (forest mice) that caught Jorge’s attention, since there were no reports of a Chilomys like this from the region. He could not identify them to species at that time, and listed them as “Chilomys sp.” in his report. No more individuals were found until a new expedition in 2016, when more were found in the highest part of the reserve. With these new individuals Jorge was able to judge the range of variation in the species’ traits. Another individual was collected in 2018 in one of the lower parts of the reserve, showing that this animal was in fact widely distributed throughout our Dracula Reserve mosaic, though most abundant in the highest parts.

Once all the individuals were studied, it became clear that these enigmatic mice were different from the other known species of Chilomys, showing that the region protected by the Dracula Reserve was not only special for plants and frogs but also for mammals.

 

DSC_0520

New Trevoria orchid. Photo: Luis Baquero

Trevoria sp. nov. (orchid)

This species discovery needed a lot of patience. The first known plant was found eight years ago in a remote part of what is now our Dracula Reserve, by orchidologist Luis Baquero and local resident Hector Yela, who is now our reserve guard. It did not have flowers so nothing could be concluded about it. Over the succeeding years several other plants were found in distant parts of the future Dracula Reserve, always without flowers. One of them was collected alive and kept in the Quito Botanical Garden, where it finally flowered for the first time this year. The flower has a strong odor of olive oil. Sadly the creation of our reserve did not happen in time to save the largest population of this species, but we have  managed to protect some of the other populations.

Please spread the word about this opportunity to support conservation and name a species. Remember, tomorrow is the day!

Lou Jost, Fundacion EcoMinga

Nuevas especies de ranas, orquídeas y ratones de bosque de la Reserva Drácula se incluyen en Subasta de Nominación de Especies de Rainforest Trust
Traducido por: Alejandra Solórzano Flores
 
IMG 01- Nueva rana de Pristimantis. Fotografía: EcoMinga/Jordy Salazar.
 
Mañana, 8 de diciembre 2018, la organización Rainforest Trust pondrá en subasta los derechos para nombrar nuevas especies alrededor del mundo. La meta es recaudar dinero para los socios de Rainforest Trust, como EcoMinga, para proteger permanentemente cada una de estas especies, y nombrar cada nueva especie en honor del donador que las protege, o de una persona o cosa que el donador designe.
Rainforest Trust describe el programa como “Una oportunidad histórica de nombrar una especie nueva para la ciencia y proteger su háibitat… Rainforest Trust está celebrando 30 años de éxito en conservación con la mayor subasta pública de derechos para la denominación de especies. Las 12 nuevas especies descubiertas que se muestran a continuación necesitan un reconocimiento científico y estamos brindando una oportunidad exclusiva para preservar su legado mediante la compra de los derechos de nominación. ¡O haga una oferta para darle el mejor regalo a un ser querido en estas fiestas! Los ingresos de esta subasta irán directamente a las reservas naturales en las cuales estas especies viven, por lo que una oferta por la nominación de estas especies es una oportunidad para salvarlas de la extinción y honrar a alguien o algo por quien te preocupas“.
Rainforest Trust ha incluido tres especies de la Reserva Dracula y sus alrededores, incluyendo el más hermoso anfibio de la subasta, el único mamífero, y la orquídea más grande.

IMG 02 – Nueva rana Pristimantis. Fotografía: Mario Yanez


Pristimantis sp. nov.  (ojos azules)
Este nuevo anfibio con inusuales ojos azules a gris-azules fueron reportados en un post anterior. Fue encontrado después de un largo viaje en uno de los mejores bosques de las estribaciones que nuestro gerente de reserva herpetólogo, Juan Pablo Reyes, ha visto alguna vez en el oeste de Ecuador. Este bosque se encuentra adyacente a nuestra Reserva Drácula actual, y es un objetivo para futuras adquisiciones, así que Juan Pablo y Mario Yánez (INABIO) se encargaron de investigarlo. Durante la primera noche en este magnifico bosque, estos cientificos experimentados en ranas se dieron cuenta rápidamente de una serie de extraños cantos de rana desconocidos, muchas de ellos provenientes del dosel sobre sus cabezas (Como los mejores observadores de aves, los buenos científicos de ranas conocen las llamadas de todos las las ranas locales, y buscan nuevas especies en su mayoría por el sonido). Buscando la fuente de estas llamadas con sus linternas, Juan Pablo y Mario finalmente encontraron el reflejo de los ojos de una de las misteriosas ranas cantando en una hoja de aracea unos 3.5 metros sobre el suelo. Juan Pablo trepó un tronco vecino y logró usar un palo para golpear la hoja, la cual cayó al suelo mientras la rana se sostenía firmemente a su superficie! Los herpetólogos la atraparon, y el momento que vieron sus ojos azules contrastando con su cuerpo amarillo con manchas color café, supieron que habían encontrado una nueva especie para la ciencia.
IMG 03 – Nuevo ratón de bosque. Fotografía: Jorge Brito
Chilomys sp. nov.
Este pequeño animal fue encontrado primero durante nuestra expedicioón inicial a Reserva Drácula en 2015, con científicos del Instituto Nacional de Biodiversidad (INABIO) y la Universidad de Basilea (Suiza) en la búsqueda de mamíferos, reptiles y anfibios. Jorge Brito del INABIO fue el experto en mamíferos. Durante la primera semana de la expedición, muy pocos animales fueron encontrados, pero entre ellos hubo tres pequeños individuos del género Chilomys (ratón del bosque) que captó la atención de Jorge, ya que no había reportes de Chilomys como este en la región. Él no pudo identificar la especie en este momento, y lo enlistó como “Chilomys sp.” en su informe. No se encontraron más individuos  hasta una nueva expedición en 2016, cuando se encontraron más en la parte más alta de la reserva. Con estos nuevos individos Jorge fue capaz de evaluar el rango de variacion de las características de esta especie. Otro individuo fue colectado en 2018 en una de las partes más bajas de la reserva, demostrando que, de hecho, este animal se distribuye ampliamente dentro del mosaico de nuestra Reserva Drácula, aunque es más abundante en las partes altas.
Una vez todos los individuos fueron estudiados, se volvió claro que estos enigmáticos ratones eran diferentes de otras especies conocidas de Chilomys, demostrando que el área protegida por la Reserva Drácula no fue especial sólo para plantas y anfibios, si no también para mamíferos.
IMG 04 – Nueva orquídea Trevoria. Fotografía: Luis Baquero
Trevoria sp. nov. (orquídea)
El descubrimiento de esta especie necesitó de mucha paciencia. La primera planta conocida fue encontrada ocho años atrás en una parte remora nde lo que hoy es Reserva Drácula por el orquideólogo Luis Baquero y el residente local Héctor Yela, quien ahora es nuestro guardia de la reserva. El individuo no tenía flores, así que no podía concluirse nada acerca de este. A lo largo de los siguientes años, muchas otras plantas se encontraron en diferentes partes de la futura Reserva Drácula, siempre sin flores. Una de ellas se colectó viva y se envió al Jardín Botánico de Quito, donde finalmente floreció por primera vez ese año. La flor tenía un fuerte aroma a aceite de oliva. Tristemente la creación de nuestra reserva no ocurrió a tiempo para salvar a la población más grande de esta especie, pero hemos logrado proteger a algunas de las otras poblaciones.
Por favor difundan la voz acerca de esta oportunidad para apoyar la conservación y nombrar una especie. Recuerden, mañana es el día!
Lou Jost, fundación EcoMinga.

An even closer encounter with a Mountain Tapir in our Rio Zunac Reserve!

 

A few days ago I posted Alyssa Kullberg’s video of a Spectacled Bear (Tremarctos ornatus) that came to dinner at our research station in the Rio Zunac Reserve. On the same trip, she and our staff ran into this fearless Mountain Tapir (Tapirus pinchaque). Our guard Santiago Recalde caught the encounter on video.  These are extraordinary sightings of rare animals that seem to have lost all fear of humans, after being protected by us for the last dozen years.

Lou Jost. Fndacion EcoMinga

¡Un encuentro aún más cercano con un Tapir de Montaña en nuestra Reserva Río Zuñac!
Unos pocos días atrás publiqué el video de Alyssa Kullberg sobre un Oso de Anteojos (Tremarctos ornatus) que vino a cenar en nuestra estación científica en la Reserva Río Zuñac. En el mismo viaje, ella y nuestro equipo se encontraron con este intrépido Tapir de Montaña (Tapirus pinchaque). Nuestro guardia, Santiago Recalde, captó el encuentro en video. Estos son avistamientos extraordinarios de animales raros que parecen haber perdido todo temor a los humanos, después de haber sido protegidos por nosotros durante los últimos doce años.
Lou Jost, Fundación EcoMinga
Traducción: Salomé Solórzano-Flores

Spectacled Bear close encounter in our Rio Zunac Reserve

Dinner guest in the Rio Zunac Reserve. Video by Alyssa Kullberg.

[Vea traduccion en Espanol abajo]

Two weeks ago we posted our reserve guard Santiago Recalde’s video of a close encounter with a fearless Mountain Tapir (Tapirus pinchaque) in our Rio Zunac Reserve. Last week Santiago returned to the same reserve with Alyssa Kullberg, a Fulbright Scholar who has just arrived here to spend the next nine months studying our new Magnolia species. They have just come back from the reserve this evening with news of their an astounding encounter with another of our large mammals, a Spectacled Bear (Tremarctos ornatus).

Alyssa told me that during the whole 4 hour hike from the roadhead to our very remote research station, they were seeing fresh Mountain Tapir, Spectacled Bear, and Puma tracks on the trail. They stayed a week in the reserve, and one day, while they were in the forest, a Spectacled Bear entered the station and stole some food. Later, while Alyssa and Santiago were eating dinner, the bear came back for more food, and approached the station quite closely (even though Alyssa and Santiago were loudly conversing) until it caught their scent. Even after catching their scent, the bear did not seem very frightened, as it paused to think about eating a young palm tree next to the trail.

20180920_170027small

Spectacled Bear coming to share dinner with Alyssa and Santiago. Note the Magnolia buds on the table in the foreground; most neotropical Magnolia species open only at night, so we have to collect the buds and care for them until nightfall. Photo: Alyssa Kullberg.

While we have seen tracks around the cabin before, and have had some minor bear damage in the past, this is the first time a bear has been this bold. We may be the victims of our own success in protecting this reserve– the animals are losing their fear of humans, so we may be heading for the kinds of bear problems that are common in North American national parks. We will try to be extra careful to protect our food, though this will not be easy. In any case, I’d rather have this problem than the problem of not having bears!

Lou Jost, EcoMinga Foundation

Encuentro cercano con un oso de anteojos en nuestra Reserva Rio Zuñac
Hace dos semanas posteamos un video de nuestro guardia Santiago Recalde acerca de un encuentro cercano con un tapir de montaña sin miedo en nuestra Reserva Rio Zuñac. La semana anterior regresamos a la misma reserva con Alyssa Kullberg, una becaria Fullbright que ha llegado aquí para invertir los siguientes nueve meses estudiando nuestra nueva especie de Magnolia. Han venido de regreso a la reserva esta tarde con noticias de su sorprendente encuentro con otro de nuestros grandes mamíferos, un oso de anteojos (Tremarctos ornatus).
Alyssa me dijo que durante las 4 horas de caminata desde la cabeza del camino hasta nuestra estación de investigación remota, vieron un Tapir de Montaña, un Oso de Anteojos, y caminos de Puma en el camino. Estuvieron una semana en la reserva , y un día, mientras estaban en el bosque, un Oso de Anteojos entró a la estación y robó algo de comida. Después, Alyssa y Santiago estaban comiendo la cena, el oso vino de regreso por mas comida, y se acercó bastante a la estación (a pesar de que Alyssa y Santiago conversaban en voz alta) hasta que atrapó su aroma. Incluso después de atrapar el aroma, el oso no se veía muy asustado, mientras se detenía a pensar en comer una palmera joven al lado del sendero.
Oso de anteojos ingresando para compartir la cena con Alyssa y Santiago. Tomar en cuenta que los brotes de Magnolia en la tabla en el suelo; muchas especies de Magnolias neotropicales se abren solo en la noche, así que tenemos que colectar los brotes y preocuparnos por ellos hasta que caiga la noche. Fotografía: Alyssa Kullberg.
Si bien hemos visto algunas pistas alrededor de la cabina antes, y hemos tenido daños menores en el pasado, esta es la primera vez que un oso de anteojos ha sido tan audaz. Es posible que seamos víctimas de nuestro propio éxito en la protección de esta reserva: los animales están perdiendo el miedo a los humanos, por lo que es posible que nos enfrentemos a los problemas de osos que son comunes en los parques nacionales de America del Norte. Intentaremos tener mucho cuidado en proteger nuestros alimentos, aunque esto no será fácil. En cualquier caso, ¿preferiría tener este problema que el problema de no tener osos!
Lou Jost, Fundación EcoMinga.
Traducción: Salomé Solórzano Flores

 

 

Mountain Tapir close encounter

 

Our pair of Black-and-chestnut Eagles (Spizaetus isidori) has been nesting again in our Rio Zunac Reserve. The Peregrine Fund has hired two of our guards’ family members, Abel Recalde and Andi Salazar, to monitor this nest and record details of prey items, etc. We’ll report on that data after the Peregrine Fund finishes analyzing it.

A few days ago, as Abel climbed the trail to the nest, he encountered a completely tame Mountain Tapir (Tapirus pinchaque). This endangered mammal is a special treat to see. He excitedly pulled out his cell phone and made the video posted above at close range. It is strong evidence that our wardens are doing a good job; our animals are loosing their fear of humans, because no one hurts them anymore.

By the way, the eagles successfully fledged a baby this year!

Screenshot_20180719-085231

Black-and-chestnut Eagle (Spizaetus isidori) baby, Generation 2018. Photo: Abel Recalde and Andi Salazar,  Peregrine Fund

Lou Jost. EcoMinga Foundation